Tragedy at Saugus Highschool

*Warning: The following article can be a sensitive topic for some audiences.*

Saugus high students Katie Thanaet and Tyler Wilson look over items left at a memorial in front of the school Tuesday, November 19, 2019.  Students were allowed back on campus to collect their belongings left behind after the tragic shooting last Thursday.  Classes will resume at the high school on December 2nd. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

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Saugus high students Katie Thanaet and Tyler Wilson look over items left at a memorial in front of the school Tuesday, November 19, 2019. Students were allowed back on campus to collect their belongings left behind after the tragic shooting last Thursday. Classes will resume at the high school on December 2nd. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

Last week on Thursday, November 14th, 2019 a  tragic occurrence happened during what seemed to be a normal morning for most students and staff members at Saugus High School. 

A student, who shall not be named, took an unregistered handgun from his house and shot 5 students at random. Once he had ended their lives, he continued his act by ending his own. The shooter died the next day. Two out of the five  victims died. 

The shooter was a student at Saugus High School who had friends, joined school activities and was a school athlete, according to Los Angeles county sheriff, Alex Villanueva, who was interviewed by CNN. No one had ever suspected something unusual from him.

Gracie Anne Muehlberger, age 15, was a victim who was shot and died. Gracie was described as the best sister ever. She was so angelic, intelligent, caring, and gorgeous,  said her older brother. 

 Dominic Blackwell, age 14, was well known for being part of the schools JROTC (Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps) and for being such a hard worker. According to Los Angeles times, one of Dominic’s ROTC comrades described him as ̈the kindest person I know.¨ He was always willing to help cadets who were struggling.

On Sunday, November 17, 2019, the community hosted a gathering to honor the two students who lost their young lives. Thousands and thousands of people showed up. Towards the end of the night, Saugus High School Principal Vince Perry said in his speech, ̈We are here to grieve the loss of two teenagers, two friends, two students, two siblings, and two children.̈ 

The suspect’s name wasn’t mentioned in this article because many mass shooters tend to do mass shooting to get their name into articles and news. The Los Angeles Times stated in their article Letters to the Editor: Journalist, don’t name mass shooters,̈ The 1st Amendment protects the dissemination of news, as long as it’s factual. So yes, unfortunately mass shootings are newsworthy. However, there is absolutely no reason to disclose the shooter’s name or publish any personal information about him.¨ 

Photo from Change.org